Gallery Update: Dublin

Named for the city in Ireland, Dublin in Georgia is an hour or so southeast of Macon. It’s my third trip there, and, like last time, I enjoyed Gerald’s company.1He seemed to enjoy the trip, rain notwithstanding, but apparently the creative juices didn’t flow. (Sorry, man.) Details here.

It has a photogenic downtown, too:

Corker (of a) Building, W. Jackson St.
Fountain and Holiday Tree, N. Monroe St. and Bellevue Ave.

The Welcome Park includes a clock and bell complete with clover, reminding visitors that the name is, in fact, a tribute:

Dublin Welcome Tower #1

As has become typical, my favorite — “best” is debatable, of course — shot is a close-up that’s almost an abstract. In this case, a turquoise box car in the appropriately-named Railroad Park:

Pull Down for Camel, Dublin Railraod Park

Just off the main drag we found an item thankfully not yet painted over:

Aqua Fox, Jefferson and Madison

. . . Which may, in fact, be a holdover from a bygone era. In fact, I’d be remiss if I didn’t call this subject out:

Laurens and Dublin Mural (No Biases Shown), S. Lawrence St.

The only people of color depicted here are Native Americans, relegated to viewing (probably from afar), and two Blacks, very much shown “in their place.” (Dublin still prominently features a Confederate memorial, as well.) Let’s hope that this small city continues its journey into the 21st century, one step at a time.

See the updated gallery here. As always, once in the gallery, click on any photograph to start a slide show.

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    He seemed to enjoy the trip, rain notwithstanding, but apparently the creative juices didn’t flow. (Sorry, man.) Details here.

New Gallery: Fickling Mill

An unintended postscript to the recent photostroll, and another in the lengthy list of places you pass through without stopping — except, this time:

Signs of White Flash
Shell Motor Oil

While tiny, Fickling Mill in 2022 is eye-catching, thanks to this building at the water crossing, and likely represents exactly what the name advertises — the location of a former mill of some sort, driven by the power of the water of Patsilinga Creek.

Patsiliga Creek Over the Fickling Mill Dam

We were there late in the day, hence the fading-yet-still-golden light:

Windmill Decor and Patsiliga Creek

Only nine photographs, but posted as a dedicated gallery. Enjoy your virtual photostroll — and thanks for visiting.

New Gallery: Talbotton

The county seat of Talbot (Wiki) was the primary destination of our recent photostroll, another of those places that are often passed through without stopping. A small, poor town — and county — its rich history absolutely deserves a home here amongst the galleries of Georgia.

Monroe Street Storefonts, Downtown

Founded in 1828, Talbotton was a center of education for the area; its architectural splendor reflects a wealth no longer present. Even the later courthouse (1892) is a beautiful structure:

Talbot County Probate Court, 26 Washington Ave.
Talbot County Court Tower #3

There was one structure in particular that I wanted to visit: the Zion Episcopal Church, an 1848 wooden item, painted dark brown with white shutters:

Historic Zion Episcopal Church, Circa 1848

Unfortunately, Georgia’s early- and mid-century legacy survives intact. From the Zion Church’s Historical Marker:

The choir loft at the east end of the structure opposite the sanctuary, above the narthex, is flanked on each side by a gallery, where slaves worshipped prior to the conflict which many believed temporarily destroyed Southern culture.

Georgia Historical Commission, 1955

The church is still beautiful, it’s still beautifully preserved and maintained, and I’m glad that we can, in 2022, look at it in the historical context it deserves.1Read more about Zion Episcopal and its place in Talbotton here.

Zion Episcopal Church (Window Detail #2)

See the church and all of Talbotton — 34 photographs in all — in the new gallery here.

Thanks to Gerald for a pleasant Sunday of fine photography.

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    Read more about Zion Episcopal and its place in Talbotton here.

Updated Gallery: Thomaston

Despite the leaves pretty much, well, leaving us, yesterday was too nice a day to not do a photostroll — or three, in our case. First up: Sprewell Bluff Park. Located in rural Upson County on a lovely bend in the Flint River, the park has long been one of those places that was driven by and not visited.

Flint River from Sprewell Bluff #1

Glad to have fixed that! Better still, it’s more than just a bluff with a view:

River and Tree in Afternoon Sun, Sprewell Park (#2)
Cairn on the Riverbank, Sprewell Park
Flint River Shoals at Sprewell (#2)
Bluff Base, Flint River

As it’s technically located there, the Thomaston gallery has grown by nineteen photographs — check it out. (As always, once in the gallery, click on any photograph to start a slide show.)

Stay tuned for Talbotton and Fickling Mill, which will be posted as soon as possible.

Thank you!

Updated Gallery: Milledgeville

The small city of Milledgeville, on the banks of the Oconee River in nearby Baldwin County, is a favorite for photography. In this case, Gerald and I stopped on our way home from Sandersville, and spent some time wandering the historic district.

Aged Signage, 101 W. Mcintosh St., Circa 1911
Fall Color, First Presbyterian Church (#1), S. Wayne St.
(Extended) Weathervane, Old Courthouse Building, 201 W. Hancock St.

I especially liked this gate:

Gate and Stairs (Going Up), 129 S. Wayne St.

We were these the day after (part of) the Deep Roots Festival, which meant some street decorations lingered:

Deep Roots Festival Balloons, S. Wayne St.

Oh, and happy Halloween:

Happily Haunted Window, S. Wayne St.

See all my photographs from Milledgeville in the updated gallery. Thank you for visiting. See you in November!

Updated Gallery: Sandersville

As promised yesterday, there’s more from Sandersville. This time, the City Cemetery, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

Sandersville’s City Cemetery National Register Sign

Some beautiful statuary within:

Not all of the plots are marked with statuary, but some have beautiful markers.

Sandersville the site of a skirmish on Sherman’s March to the Sea, and according to the official history, probably took place in the cemetery grounds itself.

A plot marker in marble, together with the U.S. and Georgia flags.
The St. Paul AME Church, seen through the fall foliage.
Long-leaf pine is typical of this area, and provides some lovely shade.

An enjoyable time on a beautiful fall day. See all of the photographs from Sandersville in the updated gallery here.

New Gallery: Sandersville, Georgia

Sandersville, seat of Washington County, was the photography destination this past weekend. Gerald and I wanted to get out and enjoy this beautiful stretch of fall weather, and this small city — with its National Register-listed cemetery (more on that tomorrow) — hadn’t yet been explored.

Dr. Gate, W. Haynes St.

There was a pleasant little park off what I’m calling Courthouse Square (it doesn’t seem to actually be named that):

Park Arch, S. Harris St.
Park in the Square, S. Harris St.

The Washington County Courthouse is a beautiful and historic building, like many here in Georgia:

Washington County Courthouse #3

Can’t close without a plug for the home team:

Drink Coke, Get Waves

See all of the photographs from Sandersville in the new gallery, and stay tuned for more tomorrow. Thanks!

See also: Gerald’s journal post on the trip.

Gallery Update: Downtown Macon

The first Friday of fall saw Gerald and I out celebrating the beautiful weather — and his new “creative camera,” a Leica M8 in pristine condition:

M8 @ Bearfoot (#3)

Which of course meant a quick spin around downtown. I was using my favorite lens, the 90mm macro, resulting in lots of detail shots:

Capitol (Theatre) Details, Second St.
Windowmaker, Mulberry St. Ln.
Peeking Across Third (Street), Downtown
Street Art Detail, Cherry & Third
Street Art Detail, Poplar & Third

With these latest additions, the Downtown Macon (2022+) gallery is at eighty photographs. Take a look.

Gallery Updates: Andersonville and Americus, Georgia

Last weekend, Gerald and I took a summer road trip and photostroll through southwest Georgia — with stops in Andersonville and Americus.

Andersonville is a sobering place: “The deadliest ground of the American Civil War.” Further:

Nearly 13,000 men died on these grounds, a site that became infamous even before the Civil War ended. Their burial grounds became Andersonville National Cemetery, where veterans continue to be buried today. This place, where tens of thousands suffered captivity so others could be free, is also home to the National Prisoner of War Museum and serves as a memorial to all American prisoners of war.

National Park Service

We just visited the National Cemetery section of the park, with its closely-spaced Civil War graves, memorials, and reminders that it’s still in use today.

Bench and Garden, Andersonville National Cemetery Rostrum
Stalag XVII Memorial Detail (WWII), Andersonville National Cemetery
Maine Civil War Memorial Statue (Photo #2) Amongst Graves, Andersonville National Cemetery
Illinois Civil War Memorial (Detail #2), Andersonville National Cemetery

Later, we headed just down the road to the small city of Americus:

Wall Painting Detail #1, Sweet Georgia Bakery and Cafe, 134 W. Lamar St., Americus
City Municipal Building and Windsor Hotel, W. Lamar St., Americus
Window Arch #2, 106 W. Lamar St., Americus

Both galleries — Andersonville and Americus — have been updated with new photographs. The new items start with “2022,” and remember that clicking on any photograph starts a slide show for that gallery. Thank you!

Gallery Update: Madison (Part 3)

As promised, I returned to Madison, Georgia, to complete the gallery my camera battery didn’t permit last time. Special thanks to Gerald, who accompanied me around the beautiful downtown historic district and on the lovely drive from here to there.

This round is mostly details, taken with my stunning new Leica APO lens. (Introduced in this Macon post.) The whole line has been discontinued, so I am incredibly glad to have gotten one while they’re still available — every single photograph shows just how good this lens is. I’ll try to do it justice:

Morgan County Courthouse #6
Light Detail, 131 E. Jefferson St.
Madison Welcome Center, Madison Square
Flower Detail, Organic Market
Building and Light Detail #2, W. Washington St.
Hart & Crown Sign, Madison Square

I’ve revamped the gallery with the new shots mixed in with the old. Several are improved versions of shots taken last time, meaning those were deleted in favor of the new ones.

132 Madison photographs have been posted in all. Peruse and enjoy; remember to click on any individual photograph to start a slide show, and if you’d like, click “buy” to get options for fine art prints in a variety of sizes and finishes. Thank you!

See also: Madison Part One and Part Two.

New Gallery: Madison (Part 2)

Continued from Part 1, below.

According to Southern Living magazine, “In Madison, Georgia, you can witness the power of tireless historic preservation efforts and take in the glory of old Southern architecture — from Greek Revival to Victorian, this town showcases all the great architectural styles.” (Read their day trip advice.)

DAR Statue and Morgan County Courthouse, Downtown

It’s certainly worth taking some time to visit — and for this guy and his camera, the restaurants, shops, stroll-worthy streets, and simply spectacular historic district represent a great opportunity to add to the treasure trove of Georgia architectural photography.

Building Detail #2, Madison Welcome Center, E. Jefferson St.
Building Detail #1, The James Madison Inn
Gazebo and Stage, Madison Town Park
Metallic Sculpture, Madison Town Park
Train and Silos, Madison

A total of 90 (!) photographs have been posted to the new Madison gallery. Once there, click on any photo to enlarge or start a slide show.

I’m not done, either: I had two lenses with me, but only one battery — which gave out before I could make a round downtown with the second lens. I’ve got another trip through the area scheduled, and will absolutely make the time to return, camera in-hand, to complete the gallery. Stay tuned.

New Gallery: Madison, Georgia (Part 1)

The past couple of days represented a much-needed break from the recent heat wave — an opportunity to get out of the house and celebrate a stunning morning with camera in-hand.

I pass through Madison regularly (it’s along the route from Macon to Athens), and have been meaning to stop and take some photographs for literally years. Today, the first of two parts this week, with more to come soon.

We start at the Madison Morgan Cultural Center and loop through the historic district — and its many, frankly stunning buildings — south of downtown:

Madison Morgan Cultural Center (Detail #4)
507 S. Main Street #1
411 Old Post Road #1
413 S. Main Street, Photographed from Old Post Road

There are a few detail shots mixed in, too, like this one from the Presbyterian Church:

Madison Presbyterian Church (Door Detail)

See the first 34 photographs in the new gallery. (Remember to double-click on a photograph to see larger.) Next time, downtown. Happy Monday!

Updated Galleries: Macon Downtown x3, Automotive

FedEx pulled up around 8:30 this morning and dropped off a new lens. (It wasn’t due ’til Tuesday — bonus!) Given that it was an absolutely beautiful morning, I shelved my plans for the day, picked up the camera, and headed downtown.

Verdict? It’s so a keeper. See for yourself:

Catholic Cross, St. Joseph’s, Macon
Purple Hydrangea, St. Joseph’s, Macon
(Funeral) Chapel, New St., Macon
552 New St. (Brick Detail), Macon
Public Art (Detail #1), D T Walton Sr Way, Macon
Tree and City Auditorium, Macon

Wound up with sixty new items posted. However, the downtown Macon gallery was getting almost too big — confusing, even — so has been separated into three parts:

One more thing: Four photographs have been added to the Automotive gallery, including this rare Mitsubishi Lancer Evo:

Macon Lancer Evo (Wheel Detail)

Enjoy your Memorial Day weekend!

Gallery Update: The Columbus Museum

As I mentioned in the last entry, Gerald and I were in Columbus, Georgia on Saturday, where our primary photographic mission was The Columbus Museum — specifically, its Olmsted Garden.

ArchDaily is to blame here; they pointed me to the following:

Celebrating the bicentennial of the birth of Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr., known as “the father of landscape architecture”, the Cultural Landscape Foundation has created an ever-growing digital guide of Olmsted’s most notable works.

I immediately looked up what was near me, and lo and behold…. (Full disclosure: the garden is actually by Bradley Olmsted, one of Fredrick’s sons.)

Of course, the building’s interesting, too, so there’s a good mix of architecture, gardens, architecture from the garden, and — you guessed it — garden architecture:

The Columbus Museum (B&W #1)
Urn, Columns and Bricks, The Columbus Museum
Crawford’s Kindred (B&W detail), The Columbus Museum
Olmsted Garden (Flower #3), The Columbus Museum
Old Pool House (B&W), Olmsted Garden, The Columbus Museum

I enjoyed the visit, and as a result of that visit, added 32 new photographs to the Columbus gallery. (They’re grouped together: “Columbus Museum – Mar22.”) Peruse anytime; purchase if you’d like. Thank you!

Updated Gallery: Columbus, Georgia

Gerald and I were in Columbus, Georgia, today, which included a delicious lunch at The Black Cow — no word whether the name is related to the Steely Dan song — and which meant a few photographs:

United States Post Office and Court House (Eagle Detail), Columbus, Georgia

One of several of the Post Office and Court House (the header photograph is that building, too), along with a few others from downtown:

Lamp and Buildings, Downtown Columbus, Georgia
Arches, Planes, and Sky, Downtown Columbus, Georgia
Tower and Spire, Downtown Columbus, Georgia

Columbus is really well covered in its dedicated gallery: check it out. The majority of today’s photographs, however, were from the Columbus Museum; those will be posted Monday. Stay tuned.